Original idea by
MK Net.Work
The email compression experts since 1995

More privacy for Webmails with ZipMail Secured Notes

Webmails privacy seems to be a real concern

Doing searches on “Gmail privacy”, “Hotmail privacy” or “Yahoo Mail privacy” returns several millions results.

About ZipMail Secured Notes

A quick and easy way to protect the privacy of emails that need to be kept confidential.

We, at MK Net.Work understand the privacy concerns of Webmail users.
It would be great for Webmail users to have an option to protect the privacy of emails that need to be kept confidential.

That’s the reason why ZipMail provides a simple and efficient way to guarantee the privacy of your Webmail emails when needed: ZipMail Secured Notes.

By using ZipMail Secured Notes to enter the text of your Webmail messages, you encrypt and protect the text of your message with a password. Doing so, you make this content strictly private to the users to which you provide this password.

To avoid Webmail privacy concerns, each time you want to send a confidential message, or to keep the content of your message strictly private, simply write a ZipMail Secured Note. (Remember that ZipMail also enables you to password protect and encrypt your Webmail attached files).

How can I write a ZipMail Secure Note?

Very easy, in your Webmail, do like if you wanted to attach a file...

In your Webmail attached file selection dialog, click the button added by ZipMail to the top right corner of the dialog:

Clicking this button will display the ZipMail Secured Note editor that can be used as a Plain Text editor (producing a .TXT file that can be opened with the Windows Notepad) or as Rich Text editor (producing a .DOC file that can be opened with the Windows Wordpad program or by Microsoft Word).

This is the ZipMail Secured Notes Editor for Plain Text notes:


This is the ZipMail Secured Notes Editor for Rich Text notes:


You can select your preferred editor by clicking your preferred Format option in the editor's window (ZipMail will remember your choice).

Once you have entered your text, enter your password for this note in the first password field.
Confirm your password by entering it again in the second password field.

If you are OK with the name of the file proposed by default, simply click the Save button (else, provide another file name).

Your text will be saved into the specified file (.txt with the Plain Text editor or .doc with the Rich Text Editor), this file will be compressed (into a Zip file) and encrypted using your password before to be automatically attached to your Webmail message.

By using a ZipMail Secured Note instead of entering the text of your email in your Webmail message body field, you have (by creating a password-protected encrypted Zip file) protected the content of your message:

- No automatic process will be able to read the text of your email now stored into a password-protected encrypted Zip file.

- Only persons to whom you provided the password applied to your ZipMail Secured Note will be able to open it.

How can the recipients of my ZipMail Secure Note open it?

Since the ZipMail Secured Note is an industry-standard Zip file, your recipients do not even need ZipMail to open it.

They can use (provided they know the password used to protect the note):

- The standard Windows XP Zip/UnZip feature (Zip folders)

- Any Zip utility like WinZip or others

- Our free unZIP utility that can be downloaded from this link

Of course, if your recipients have ZipMail installed, opening this file in the Notepad (.TXT) or in the WordPad or MS Word (.DOC) will be really quick and easy since ZipMail includes transparent Zip decompression features.

The only things ZipMail users have to do are:

- In their message, click the attached file link (The secured notes is a Zip attached file) to download it

- Enter the password when asked by ZipMail

If the password is the good one, the Secured Note will be automatically opened by ZipMail (in the Notepad for Plain Text (.txt) notes or in the Wordpad or MS Word for Rich Text (.doc) notes) at the end of the download.